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BBC’s rip-off “charities” rip us off yet again

You probably know that the huge, cash-guzzling monstrosity that is the BBC is just finishing one of its major charity appeals – Sports Relief. Apparently over £53m has already been raised from the great British public. But where does this money actually go? I’m trying to find out and hope to have some information in a few days. In the meantime, why don’t we have a quick look at the other major BBC charity appeal – Children in Need?

Summing up the charity’s 2013 performance, the big boss wrote: “The incredible generosity of the public saw us raise our second highest total ever of £43.3 million and every penny of that will be used to support projects helping to change the lives and prospects of children and young people across the UK”. Yippeee! What a promise – “every penny of that will be used to support projects helping to change the lives and prospects of children and young people across the UK”. What a great guy!

But, it’s not quite true is it, Mr Big BBC boss?

In 2012, Children in Need employed just 73 people. In 2013, this had shot up by 22% to 89 people.

OK, so they hired a few more people, no big deal you might think. But we are living in a time when public-sector bodies are supposed to be cutting their costs, not increasing them. And let’s look at the salaries and pensions of these lucky “charity” workers. In 2012 these cost us £2,419,000. In 2013, this had rocketed up by an astonishing 52% to £3,673,000. This meant that the average remuneration (salary, social security and pension) paid to Children in Need employees glided effortlessly up from £33,137 in 2012 to a delicious (for them) £41,270 for 2013 – a rise of 25%.

Oh, and in case you were wondering how the remuneration at the BBC’s Children in Need compared to that at other charities, here’s the answer

Charity Employee Cost

Hoorray! It’s party time! Not for the children in need, but for the fortunate few who somehow landed wonderful well-paid, well-pensioned jobs for life at the BBC’s Children in Need charity.

Oh, and while we’re on the subject of charity, could someone out there please buy a copy of my recent book GREED UNLIMITED? Please, please. I do quite a lot of work for some of the blogs I write, so it would be good to know some of them are appreciated.

(I’ve found the numbers for the BBC’s Sport Relief. What a total shambles! What an expensive shambles! All will be revealed tomorrow)

4 comments to BBC’s rip-off “charities” rip us off yet again

  • Paris Claims

    I remember the first telethon. I had been moved by the plight of unfortunate people and was half way through giving my 16 digit No in order to make a donation.
    All of a sudden the “action” switched to a “youth club in Brent” that had poor facilities and needed an up grade. There were a load of middle aged rastas smoking dope and playing pool. Needless to say the transaction did not complete.

  • shortchanged

    Charity begins at ‘home’ as in your family. Dark days are ahead.

  • martin aitken

    I dont think its right that people should get rich from charity

  • martin aitken

    I dont think its right that people should live and get rich fro the berieved

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