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Are students and old people being impoverished to pay for immigrants?

Though I’m not the world’s greatest mathematician, I’ve been looking at the real costs of five million legal and perhaps two million illegal immigrants to Britain.

Direct benefits to unemployed immigrants are almost £10bn a year. Then there’s schooling (about £3.3bn), child benefits (over £1bn) and healthcare (another £8bn). That gets us to over £22bn.  Once you add in benefits for the low-paid, housing, policing, social services, translation services and many other  costs, I believe the cost of the immigrants who have come to Britain since Blair’s New Labour flung open our borders is at least £30bn a year. In fact, if you include the benefits paid to British unemployed whose jobs have been taken by immigrants, the cost is probably much higher.

So, what could £30bn a year buy us?

There are about 1,928,140 university students in Britain. If we assume they are paying an average of £6,000 a year in tuition fees, that’s £11.568bn in fees.

Oh, look! If we didn’t have to pay £30bn a year for benefits and public services to immigrants, then we could provide completely free university education to these 1,928,140 university students and still have £18.432bn left out of our £30bn.

Now let’s think about the elderly, many of whom will have worked and paid taxes all their lives (unlike immigrants, most of whom will have contributed little to nothing to Britain). We have about 12,075,000 pensioners. If we didn’t have to pay £30bn a year for immigrants, even after we had provided free university education for Britain’s 1,928,140 students, we’d still have another £18.432bn to pay increased pensions. That’s about another £30 per week per pensioner. I’m sure that would be welcome in many pensioner households.

Or, let’s play another game with the numbers. It costs about £25,000 a year to provide residential care for each of the 400,000 elderly people in nursing homes in Britain – that’s around £10bn. And it costs around £7bn to provide care for those elderly who have stayed in their own homes. So the £18.432bn would be sufficient to pay for nursing home care and homecare for all the elderly who need it.

But do our students have free university tuition? No. And do all pensioners have free end-of-life care? No. Why not? Because we need at least £30bn to pay for all the immigrants that we are being forced to take by our masters in Brussels.

Of course, here I’m just playing around with a few numbers. But hopefully I’m showing the catastrophic effect uncontrolled immigration is having on British people. If we could restrict immigration as they do in Australia and New Zealand, we’d save enough money to give free university education to 1,928,140 university students plus enough money to pay for end-of-life care for all our elderly.

That seems a terrible price that we British are paying for taking in millions of people from the world’s and the EU’s most blighted, misgoverned, corrupt, and often religiously backward hell-hole countries.

(You won’t see articles and figures like this in our politically-correct main stream media. So, it would be nice if you showed some support for this website by buying a copy of my latest book GREED UNLIMITED)

2 comments to Are students and old people being impoverished to pay for immigrants?

  • Paris Claims

    I think Geert Wilders stated that if it wasn’t for muslim immigration, the Dutch govt could buy each and every one of its citizens a yacht.
    In the X-ray dept at Bournemouth Hospital yesterday, there was a sign on the wall…..28 different languages!

  • John Fields

    When you think of the state that this country is in I.e, bankrupt, immigration
    problems, increasing use of food banks, how the hell can Mr. Cameron
    contemplate dragging us into another war?

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