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Was it woke diversity that destroyed the Titanic submersible?

Friday/weekend blog

I’m writing and posting this blog on Thursday everning. So I don’t know if the mainstream media will cover this story. If they do, I apologise for wasting your time. But I suspect this won’t be mentioned as it contradicts the mainstream-media narrative that youth and diversity are wonderful and white middle-aged men are a curse on humanity. So the more diverse we are and the fewer white middle-aged men we listen to, the more the world will be a modern paradise. Or so we’re told. Especially on Windrush Day when we celebrate the ‘amazing’ contribution people from the Carribean have supposedly made to our country.

Stockton Rush, CEO of the OceanGate company responsible for the Titanic exploration (tourist trip?) submarine currently lost at sea, seems to have prioritized diversity over experience when putting together his company. “When I started business… other sub operators [were] out there but they typically [had] gentlemen who are ex-military submariners… a whole bunch of 50-year-old white guys,” he said during a 2020 intervuew.

“I wanted our team to be younger, to be inspirational… [A] 25-year-old who’s a sub pilot or a platform operator or one of our techs can be inspirational,” he said while an image of a female crew member showed on screen, adding: “We also want our team to have a variety of different backgrounds.

Of course, I am not an undersea exploration expert. But I am a qualified ‘day skipper’, so have a basic understanding of things like water and waves and suchlike. And I imagine that had the submersible company employed what the big boss seemingly contemptuously refers to as ‘a whole bunch of 50-year-old white guys’, who were ‘ex-military submariners’, then these ‘50-year-old white guys’ might have suggested things like:

  • what about having a transponder, like they have in planes, so rescuers can find us if something goes wrong?
  • what about having a big metal loop on the top of the submersible so we can be winched to safety if we have problems? From the little I have seen, I believe that had the submersible been found in time, the rescuers would have had the almost impossible job of looping a cable round it as there was nothing to attach a rescue cable to
  • what about having back-up electrical systems as the electrics had already failed on several previous dives?
  • is it a great idea that the submersible can only be opened from outside, so people inside have no means of escape under their control as they are bolted in? So, even if the submersible had floated to the surface, the people inside could still have died from lack of oxygen had rescuers not reached them in time to unbolt the craft
  • is it a great idea that parts of the submersible were bought from the local branch of the American version of B&Q? After all, the pressure at 3,000+ metres is rather more than in the typical DIY home improvement. Though, I do appreciate that, if you open an account at many DIY stores, you do get better prices on everything you buy
  • shouldn’t we get some kind of safety certification before taking paying passengers to what is probbaly the most dangerous place on Earth?
  • is a vessel piloted by a gaming controller really a serious design to travel to what is probbaly the most dangerous place on Earth?

Maybe there are good reasons why other submersible companies employ ‘50-year-old white guys’ who are‘ex-military submariners’ who could pose awkward questions based on their real-life experience rather than ‘inspirational, diverse’ young people with little to no experience and who probably wouldn’t have the confidence to question questionable decisions made by their big boss?

Here’s the interview in which the CEO of the submersible expresses his admiration for the ‘inspiration’ of young diverse people and his contempt for 50-year-old white guys’ who are ‘ex-military submariners’.

I suspect the BBC and C4 News won’t be mentioning this:

8 comments to Was it woke diversity that destroyed the Titanic submersible?

  • tomsk

    A prime example of the foolishness of the woking class. If I was a CEO of any company/venture/business I would simply want the best people for the job, the most qualified and able, the diversity of it would not matter even of the majority were not like me. If you were qualified and able you would be employed regardless of your race/gender/age. The success of my business would depend on such. This is common sense surely. Can you imagine this thing floating to the surface and the company within cant open and they suffocate as they look out of thw windows at the approaching rescue boats. What lunacy.

  • Paul Chambers

    Awful although implosion maybe something of a relief for the grieving families.

    Maybe they wanted youngsters as they don’t ask awkward questions. Those experienced grizzled 50 year olds may not be afraid to challenge which is the last thing anybody wants these days. We all have to go over the cliff together. Diversity of everything except thought.

  • Hardcastle

    Huge wealth often appears to lead to arrogance and a belief that they can delve into areas in which they have no expertise.This guy would appear to meet these criteria
    Remind you of other things happening now and recently.Money corrupts and big money corrupts totally.

  • Ed P

    Computer modelling (i.e., guesswork) played a large part. Allegedly the only pressure test was a dive to a lesser depth for approx 10 hours, from which the 3800m Titanic depth was deemed safe, with the 10 hours/one man oxygen extrapolated to 96 hours/5 men. These people were not fit to run a whelk stall.

  • A Thorpe

    I suspect that we will hear a lot of different views before the truth emerges. I read that the vessel had made journeys to the Titanic before this trip and it was thoroughly checked after each. But also that it had no official approval of its safety. Perhaps the CEO needed “woke” staff to make progress with the project. Those with knowledge of the problems would still be discussing them.

    Last night Ress-Mogg talked of their bravery and compared them to early explorers sailing into the unknown. There was no comparison because we do have scientific knowledge today, something Mogg showed his ignorance about when he declared he had learned about the huge pressures at that depth. He also has revealed that he has no understanding of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, or the empirical evidence against human caused climate change. And this is from somebody who was Business Secretary. He is typical of today. We live in a technologically advanced society and most people remain ignorant of even the basic knowledge of how we got here.

    In my view there was no scientific exploration involved in this trip. It was a holiday sight seeing trip where the travellers failed to assess the risks and take out travel insurance. Like many others who have no insurance they expect expensive rescue operations to be carried out at somebody else’s expense. If they had assessed the risks and tried to take out insurance, it would have been unaffordable. The lesson from this is that we must take responsibility for our own actions and not put others at risk dealing with our mistakes.

    Mogg ended with saying a prayer, confirming that the human race has always had a flimsy connection with reality, which also sums up this tragic adventure and our uncertain future.

  • Mick B

    I read somewhere that somebody raised safety concerns in 2018 and was promptly sacked. For some strange reason no other safety concerns seem to have been noticed.

  • NoVaxxholeMe

    Apparently, air-traffic control in many places in the USA, which is mostly done by white men who have the best mental abilities to do the job, is coming under attack by the diversifiers. If successful, how long until there are large numbers of plane crashes? – Thankfully, my flying days are over.

  • Jeffrey Palmer

    One notes that fully eight hours went by after Oceangate had lost contact with the Titan sub, before they contacted the US Coastguard.

    Eight hours? After an experimental submarine, diving to over two miles in depth, goes AWOL?

    Hmm… maybe Oceangate’s now-departed ‘Woke’ CEO wasn’t entirely the most popular kid on the block.

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