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Look at Australian pensions and weep for British pensioners

Here are the figures from an Australian Government website giving details of state pensions in Australia (click on picture to see more clearly)

australia pensions

A single person gets $827.00 a fortnight – equivalent to £220 a week. A couple get $1,246.80 a fortnight – equivalent to £332 per week. So, Australians get more than double the pension we get in Britain.

So, why can’t we afford to pay our pensioners more?

Firstly, because we’re rapidly heading for national bankruptcy with our national debt rising from £750bn in 2010 to £1.4trn by 2015.

Well, why can’t the Government cut spending?

There are obviously many reasons. But a key one could be the tsunami  of immigrants flooding into Britain each year all wanting housing, healthcare, education for their children, benefits if they’re not working, even benefits if they’re working but in low-paying jobs and of course benefits if they’re working cash in  hand pretending to be unemployed. Plus they want child credits for their real or imaginary children either living with them in Britain or else back in their countries of origin. In 2013, over 600,000 immigrants – an incredible 12,000 a week – poured across what we laughably still call our “borders”.

So, how much are the 7 to 8 million people, who have arrived in Britain over the last 15 years, costing us?

Well, let’s assume there are just 7 million (in reality there are probably many more) and of these 20% are unemployed and receiving £15,000 a year each in services and benefits – that’s £21bn – almost enough to increase the British state pension by £25 a week. And let’s assume that about half of the employed 5.6 million are getting, say £7,000 a year more in benefits and services than they pay in tax. Yippee – there’s another £20bn. That’s yet another £25 a week on the state pension. And let’s assume the rest are just getting £3,000 a year more in benefits and services than they pay in tax – there’s £8bn more – enough for almost another £10 on the state pension. Oh, look, if we didn’t have these 7 million immigrants, we could increase the state pension by at least £60 per week. And let’s imagine there would be a million more British people in work, if there weren’t so many immigrants – whoopee another £10bn saved, another £10 per week on the state pension. We’d still not be at Australian levels, but we’d be getting close.

So, on behalf of Britain’s 7+ million immigrants, I’d like to thank Britain’s pensioners for being so generous that they’ve voted in successive governments, which have been more interested in giving money to immigrants, who have contributed nothing to Britain, than in keeping this money for British pensioners, most of whom will have worked and paid tax for 40 years or more. Hurray for Britain’s extremely generous pensioners! Hurray for the millions of Britain’s pensioners who are willingly living in poverty so that immigrants can live the life of Riley at their expense!

2 comments to Look at Australian pensions and weep for British pensioners

  • right_writes

    That’s not very “on-message” now David is it…?

    Everyone knows that uncontrolled immigration brings untold benefits…

    We are so enriched by hearing all those different languages being spoken (all day, every day…).

    The whole thing only boosts the economy.

    To say nothing of the general feeling of togetherness and wellbeing that is engendered,

    Vote UKIP!

    And vote often.

  • John Fields

    As a pensioner for 22 years reality for me is a 25 per cent reduction in my
    Heating Allowance, a frozen Tax Allowance, which means my pension increase is
    taxed at 20 per cent. No doubt the future will be a payment towards my free bus pass!
    Anyone contemplating paying towards a private pension should think again.

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