August 2017
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Welcome to Africa’s richest and poorest country

Equatorial Guinea is a wonderful country. Why? Because it’s a perfect example of everything that is wrong with that blighted, poverty-stricken sewer of a continent – Africa. It’s an example of why more than a million Africans a year will head for Europe, swamping our countries and turning our cities into stinking, crowded, crime-ridden, diseased, foul Third-World slums.

Equatorial Guinea is one of the wealthiest countries in Africa. In fact it’s one of the wealthiest countries in the world. It has a GDP of over $20bn and a population of just 700,000. The country is ranked 20th in the world in terms of GDP per capita, ahead of Iceland and the UK.

Since the start of oil production in the mid-nineties, Equatorial Guinea has become Africa’s wealthiest nation on a per-capita basis ($29,940); for comparison, South Africa’s is $7,336, Nigeria’s $3,000. The country is the third-largest oil producing country in sub-Saharan Africa. In fact, Equatorial Guinea produces so much oil that it has been called “Africa’s Kuwait”

So it should be a great place to live. Yet most of the population lives on little more than $1 a day. Average life expectancy barely reaches 55 and it has one of the highest rates of child mortality in the world:

equat 1

So, if the GDP per capita is $29,940 and the earnings per person of most of the population is less than $365 a year, then where does all the money go? Here are just a few of the sports cars belonging to the vice president of Equatorial Guinea, who also happens to be the son of the president (Teodoro Obiang Nguema), being confiscated in 2011 as part of corruption investigations in Paris.

equat 4

Some of the cars were worth €1 million each. The cars were auctioned off for €3.1 million

Yup, you guessed it. The country’s massive wealth is being siphoned off by the ruling family and a few of their cronies. The president came to power by way of a coup against his own uncle some 36 years ago – he’s been suspicious of all political opposition ever since. The president regularly is re-elected with somewhere between 97% and 100% of the vote so must be very popular indeed.

He’s so popular that in July 2003, state-operated radio declared Obiang “the country’s god” and had “all power over men and things.” It added that the president was “in permanent contact with the Almighty” and “can decide to kill without anyone calling him to account and without going to hell.” He personally made similar comments in 1993.

Internal critics and human rights activists who become troublesome are invited to reflect on their disloyalty in Equatorial Guinea’s notorious Black Beach prison. Many opponents have been accused of conspiring with foreign powers to bring down the government.

The 2004 failed coup attempt led by the British mercenary Simon Mann (allegedly funded in part by Mark Thatcher, son of Margaret Thatcher, the former UK Prime Minister), served to fuel President Obiang’s paranoia that everyone is out to get him.

How rich is the ruling family? $1bn? £5bn? $10bn? Who knows. The country is ranked 163rd out of 176 in Transparency International’s corruption perceptions index. When asked about corruption in his country, the president displayed his sense of humour: “No-one steals here… On the contrary, what my government has done to this country is to increase the living standards of the people and provide better infrastructure”.

Here’s Obummer grovelling to Obiang when he should be sending in the marines to kill the thieving scumbag to free Equatorial Guinea’s people from their impoverishment:

equat 7

The tragedy is that the ruling elites could have used just a little of their country’s wealth to put into development – schools, hospitals, power stations, water supply, universities etc – and still stolen billions. But like almost all African leaders, the ruling kleptocracy had to have it all and have totally  and unnecessarily impoverished their people.

Equatorial Guinea is not an exception in Africa. It is Africa. And until Western governments act by closing down any banks handling the money stolen by Africa’s kleptocrats, the impoverished masses will continue to flood into Europe condemning us to the same misery they are escaping from:

we've ruined our countries

And what are our leaders doing? Acting to cut corruption in Africa? Nope we’re giving billions in aid to be stolen by Africa’s elites and we’re providing free ferry services across the Med for anyone who wants to come to Europe!

And for those who haven’t seen it, here’s my short (3 mins) YouTube video showing what really happens to the billions in aid we send to Africa. Enjoy and please send the link to all your contacts so we can spread the truth that the mainstream media refuses to mention because of political correctness and fear of being called “waaaccciiiissssttt”

1 comment to Welcome to Africa’s richest and poorest country

  • david brown

    The UK Government only pretends to want to stop large scale immigration from outside the EU. One of London’s biggest sandwich companies is mainly staffed by Africans as is the biggest Sushi company.
    There are only civil penalties for employing illegals , Blair created over 3600 criminal offences. The Conservatives made homeless people squat a criminal offence . People who take their children out of school in term time get a criminal record.
    We can get all the workers we want from the EU. But not cheap enough for sandwich makers. All the main political parties are in the pay of companies who want ultra cheap labor such as care homes. The French are right about the camp of the saints in Calais been our fault.
    The lying Theresa May could stop the UK being a magnet for African migrants by making it a criminal offence to employ illegal migrants by not doing so she proves she is really in favor of illegal migrants.

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